How do you prepare for your child’s surgery?

I don’t know about you, but I am the type of person who needs to know the pros and cons, and all the potential side effects and worst case scenarios. It helps me to just feel prepared for anything.

This actually really seems to bother my husband sometimes as he feels I am dwelling on the worst case, fearing the worst for no reason. I don’t know how to fully explain it but for me, I’d rather be prepared for the worst and get to celebrate the best than be so unprepared that I didn’t see the situation coming.

So why am I sharing this? We drove this week to the BC Children’s Hospital to see several specialist involved in V’s care for her genetic condition. This involved meeting an ophthalmologist surgeon who performed surgery on Thursday. We also met with a neurologist to confirm sure isn’t having any neurological complications of her vision and had an EEG to confirm and a requisition for an MRI to get a baseline of her central nervous system.

We have 10 doctors who are involved in V’s medical care, most of which have been supportive and helpful. Most of our appointments have been the perfect example of a supportive medical team.

But that isn’t always the case. We are so blessed to have such an amazing team. This week, meeting the two new specialists, as well as everyone involved in her care in the hospital during her surgery, including anesthetists, medical residents, and nurses to name a few, was nerve wracking. What if they aren’t supportive in our struggle with her uncommon allergies, what if they won’t listen to our requests for specific meds, for the necessity in certain IV fluids, food etc.

For anyone that wants to know about corn allergies and what hospital treatment and care looks like check out the following links:

Emergency Room Protocol

Hospital and Medical Safety with Corn Allergy

ER Safety: Emergency Medical Treatment with a Corn Allergy

So how did we prepare for surgery for our little girl? For starters, we have a “care plan” for lack of a better word made up for her. This includes her daily routine (which is helpful if we have people watching her), emergency numbers, medical conditions, allergies, including her safe foods that she can eat and where we buy them, the emergency room protocol for corn allergies, what to do in case of an anaphylactic reaction or a FPIES reaction, and information on her genetic condition, IP.

We also brought copies of the protocol to give to the anaesthetist and doctors, including a list of safe and unsafe things for her. This included medications, IV fluids and other practices.

Obviously not everyone needs to have all of this if your kid doesn’t have allergies affected by hospital care. So what can everyone else do to prepare?

We always prepare before any appointments by writing down concerns we have, things we have questions about, and ask about potential complications with any procedure that needs to occur. We talk about in emergency situations what steps would be taken or how long a procedure would take and what recovery will look like.

Often times doctors have done a procedure so many times that they forget that us as parents or patients are worried or don’t fully understand exactly what they are going to do. Don’t be scared to stop them from leaving, ask more questions, ensure that you feel comfortable with everything that is going to happen.

One thing I haven’t mentioned yet is surgery start times and fasting. When your kid doesn’t understand why you aren’t giving them food when they keep asking for it, it is so difficult. Thank goodness V was able to be distracted by a walk, playing with toys in the waiting room, more walking, and watching a little TV. If that didn’t work, I don’t know how we would have made it so long. She was starved.

I always hoped and prayed that I wouldn’t have to experience the fear of walking away while my child was put to sleep with anaesthetic for a surgery. It is a scary thing. We talked about who would go in with V to hold her while they put the mask on and put her to sleep with the medication. That was a hard decision for me. Do I want to be there while she is terrified and then walk away with her unconcious?

So what do you do while you wait? Well I wanted to keep my mind busy, so we actually went and ate our packed lunch. We were a couple floors down and I knew they had our number. I needed to be distracted. Obviously not everyone can eat when their little one is in surgery, so what else can you do?

We packed a couple small card games to play and our books to read. And obviously we had our phones as well. V’s surgery was only 45 minutes, so we had no issue filling that time. Just do whatever you need to do. If you need to leave the ward or if you can’t leave just in case, those are both ok.

If you bawl your eyes out the whole time or never shed a tear, you are an amazing parent. It isn’t easy having your precious child in surgery, whether it is major surgery or something simple, it’s scary. Feel what you need to feel and don’t feel embarrassed.

Getting to see V after surgery was so heartening and heartbreaking. Be warned that it may take a while for them to feel ok, to settle in. It took V about 30 minutes to calm down and feel better. I’m going to be honest, I am so thankful we are still breastfeeding as it was such a simple, easy way to help her stay calm and feel safe.

So what am I trying to say with all of this? Maybe just that surgery is terrifying and it’s ok to be worried sick. Do your research, find all your answers before hand, and know that those doctors only want what is best for your little one.

One thought on “How do you prepare for your child’s surgery?

  1. Pingback: Rare Disease Day – A Free Life

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